In the '70s, Roy Munsen was a bowling phenomenon. He was none too sharp about picking friends, though, and the champion he had to beat, "Big Ern," takes him under his supposedly friendly wing. Big Ern shows him the high-living lifestyle, and induces him to go on the road with him, hustling small-town bowlers. A couple of the men he bilks take exception to the scam, and show their displeasure with Roy by mangling his hand. Twenty years later, Roy (who now has a hook in place of his hand), earns his living as a salesman. On a visit to a bowling alley, he cannot help but notice the incredible talents of an Amish boy, Ishmael. Bowling is not part of the Amish lifestyle, but Ishmael occasionally sneaks into the bowling alley and plays a frame or two. Roy takes Ishmael under his wing, and together they begin a quest for bowling success.


This Steven Spielberg-directed exploration into a long-ago episode in African-American history recounts the trial that followed the 1839 rebellion aboard the Spanish slave ship Amistad and captures the complex political maneuverings set in motion by the event. Filmed in New England and Puerto Rico, the 152-minute drama opens with a pre-credit sequence showing Cinque and the other Africans in a violent takeover of the Amistad. Captured, they are imprisoned in New England where former slave Theodore Joadson, viewing the rebels as "freedom fighters," approaches property lawyer Baldwin, who attempts to prove the Africans were "stolen goods" because they were kidnapped. Running for re-election, President Martin Van Buren overturns the lower court's decision in favor of the Africans.

Santa Mesa

Following his mother's death, Hector arrives in Manila to live with his grandmother. Unable to speak Tagalog, Hector falls in with a street gang before a photographer (Jaime Tirelli of TV's KIDNAPPED) takes him under his wing. Haunted by memories of his mother, Hector photographs an anonymous woman (OSCAR Winner Melissa Leo of THE FIGHTER, FROZEN RIVER) only to have their seemingly disconnected lives collide.

The Temp

Life in the corporate world can be murder. At Mrs. Appleby's, some people would kill to get ahead. Peter Derns (Timothy Hutton), a junior exec at Mrs. Appleby's cookie company, is afraid his future prospects are crumbling faster than the product he markets. Hope appears in the curvaceous form of Kris Bolin (Lara Flynn Boyle), his new temp. Gorgeous, bright and efficient, Kris helps Peter develop a deliciously successful marketing campaign. But after two executives meet mysterious deaths. Peter fears for his job security may end permanently due to the one person he needs to trust—his temp.

The Black Orchid

Anthony Quinn and Sophia Loren star as longtime widower Frank and recently widowed Rose, lonely hearts who discover something special in The Black Orchid, a sensitive comedy romance directed by Martin Ritt (Norma Rae, Murphy's Romance). What they discover is each other - and a love that restores joy in their lives. Yet before they can say "I do," Frank's daughter says "No you don't!" With all the heart and courage they possess, Frank and Rose work to win over his daughter and to rescue Rose's son from a path that has him headed for reform school. Love may be better the second time around... but for Frank and Rose it's also a lot more complicated!

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Family Friendly

Antoine de Saint-Exupery's slender, beloved classic of innocence and discovery comes to the screen with its feet firmly on the Saharan sand, its eyes titled to the stars and its spirit brightly soaring to the songs of Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Lowe. "The score of 'The Little Prince' is a sheer delight," says Vincent Canby of "The New York Times." Delightful, too, is the magical storyline about a desert-stranded pilot and a wandering child from a faraway place.

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A computer whiz and his roommate get caught up in an adult chat site they create, and computer fiction blends with reality. A 2002 Sundance Film Festival Official Selection.

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Most Watched

There's something funny about those two new priests, In fact, there's something downright hilarious. Because Robert De Niro and Sean Penn aren't clergymen at all. They're escaped cons whose only prayer is to pass themselves off as men of the cloth... and pass right by a police blockade at the border into the safety of Canada. Demi Moore joins De Niro and Penn in this clever romp scripted by David Mamet.